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Is there a difference in meaning and usage between "what I hear" and "from what I hear"?

English Language Learners Asked by Dmytro O'Hope on December 21, 2020

Could you tell me in which situations I use what I hear and from what I hear? Is there any difference in meaning and usage between them? For example:

What I hear is that a vaccine for Covid-19 will be available soon.

From what I hear is that a vaccine for Covid-19 will be available soon.

2 Answers

"From what I hear is that (...)" is bad grammar, mixing up two structures into a nonfunctional mess. It's either

What I hear is that a vaccine will be available soon.
or
From what I hear, a vaccine will be available soon.
or also
I hear (that) a vaccine will be available soon.

Correct answer by Divizna on December 21, 2020

The meanings are the same, but the second is not idiomatic

From what I hear, a vaccine will be available soon.

It is slightly more concise than “What I hear is that ...” It may also express a slightly greater degree of doubt.

Answered by Jeff Morrow on December 21, 2020

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